Fermented Garlic

Fermented Garlic: Your Dragon Glass for this Winter’s War

Ok. I truly hate to be the one to bring this up while we are all enjoying a beautiful summer, but…Winter Is Coming! We need a stockpile of “dragon glass” (aka fermented garlic) to win the war against colds, sinus infections, flus, bronchitis, and stomach bugs this sickness season. (If you’re not a Game Of Thrones fan, I apologize, but I just couldn’t resist.) Even though I believe a crucial part of being healthy is being present in the moment, this, of course, has to be balanced with preparation for the future, something I failed at last year because “winter” came early. 

Last winter:

Last winter was a doozy for us here in the pacific northwest, especially my little household! I can usually get through the winter with a cold or two (and rarely a GI bug), but not last winter. My littlest one started preschool and brought home every sniffle and flu. Every single one. I had meant to make this fermented garlic, but the season started off with a bang in September, and if I wasn’t sick myself, I was caring for a sick child (or two). I had my usual arsenal of homemade echinacea tincture (go here to learn how to make your own tinctures), elderberry syrup, raw cod liver oil, and kraut juice (this one was our savior), but I feel like if I had had the fermented garlic, I could have prevented more of the colds or nipped them in the bud before they took me (and my family) down.  

This summer:

Fast forward to this beautiful, sunny summer day, and I am starting my preparations for the winter to come. The first item on my list is to stockpile fermented garlic for my family and friends. With fermented garlic, you get the benefits of raw garlic multiplied without the drawbacks such as garlic breath and garlic sweat. I am sensitive to the smell of raw garlic on my breath or through my skin, but fermented garlic and cooked garlic are fine. Although cooked garlic is good for you, it doesn’t hold a candle to raw garlic, and can’t even come close to being compared with fermented garlic. As always, I would love to break down the nutrition for you in my attempt to convince you to make this for your family as well.  

Fermented Raw Garlic:

Garlic Cloves

  • Is powerfully antibacterial. It has been shown to be effective against drug resistant bacteria. 
  • Is anti-fungal, and antiviral. It can not only prevent colds and flus but also lessen the severity and duration. It has been shown to be particularly effective in inhibiting the growth of bacteria in the GI tract and lungs. This is due to the high allicin content. 
  • Is loaded with probiotics to support your microbiome
  • Lowers blood pressure and protects against heart disease
  • Balances cholesterol levels by lowering bad cholesterol
  • Contains protective antioxidants
  • Promotes healthy blood sugar levels and can even help with diabetes
  • Has anti-cancer properties
  • Reduces yeast infections such as Candida
  • Can reduce build up of plaque in the arteries
  • Removes heavy metals, such as mercury, from the body
  • Is helpful for ulcerative colitis

To make one quart of fermented garlic you will need:

  • 12-14 heads of garlic, peeled
  • 2 T sea salt
  • One quart mason jar
  • Airlock lid (optional)
  • herbs (optional) Some good and tasty antibacterial and antiviral herbs are oregano and rosemary.
  • Optional: starter culture (if you use starter culture, you will want to reduce the amount of salt.)

First, to peel the garlic, start by smashing one head with the heel of your hand. Next, place the cloves in between two bowls and shake, shake, shake!! (Metal bowls are really the only way to go here. Borrow them if you have to. You don’t want to peel this many cloves with a paring knife or even one of those rollers. ) Your garlic head should be peeled. Continue on with the rest of your garlic heads.

Second, fill your clean quart jar with your peeled garlic. Leave at least one inch of headspace. Next, pour your salt water (or dissolved culture plus salt water) over your peeled garlic. Add any herbs such as rosemary or oregano. Top with a fermentation weight. Leave out of direct sunlight for at least 3 or 4 weeks. The longer it ferments, the more powerful it gets and the milder it tastes. A win, win in my book. I prefer it to have a more mild roasted garlic flavor. You can ferment it much longer than 4 weeks if you like. 

 

Fermented Garlic
Fermented garlic to prevent and lessen the severity of colds and flus.
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Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 12-14 heads of garlic, peeled
  2. 2 T sea salt
  3. One quart mason jar
  4. Airlock lid (optional)
  5. herbs (optional)
  6. Optional: starter culture (if you use starter culture, you will want to reduce the amount of salt.)
Instructions
  1. First, to peel the garlic, start by smashing one head with the heel of your hand. Next, place the cloves in between two bowls (metal is best) and shake, shake, shake!! Your garlic head should be peeled. Continue on with the rest of your garlic heads.
  2. Second, fill your clean quart jar with your peeled garlic. Leave at least one inch of headspace. Next, pour your salt water (or dissolved culture plus salt water) over your peeled garlic. Add any herbs such as rosemary or oregano. Top with a fermentation weight. Leave out of direct sunlight for at least 3 or 4 weeks. The longer it ferments, the more powerful it gets and the milder it tastes. A win, win in my book. I prefer it to have a roasted garlic flavor. You can ferment it much longer than 4 weeks if you like.
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Fermented Garlic

How should I use my fermented garlic?

  • First, you can just chomp on a clove if you feel a cold coming on. I would probably follow that with some elderberry syrup mixed with echinacea tincture a few times a day. Mixing fermented garlic with raw honey is another (tastier) possibility. Raw honey has it’s own host of benefits when it comes to fighting colds and flus. You can’t go wrong with a bit of kraut juice either. 
  • Second, use your fermented garlic preventatively in cooking. (This will probably be the easiest way to get it in your children if you have them.) I prefer to use it in unheated dishes so that I don’t kill the probiotics. Some ideas are white bean dip, hummus, salsas, salad dressings, garlic butter, and pesto. Basically, anywhere you would use raw garlic or roasted garlic should work.Be sure to save the garlic brine after all the garlic is used up. It is great to use in dressings or marinades.

 

Have you had fermented garlic before? If so, did you ferment it yourself? What did you think?