Fermented Beets

Fermented Beets: A Nutritional Powerhouse

Fermented beets (or “pickled”) are one of my favorite ferments. I like to eat them in my salads. They also go great with goat cheese!! They are so simple to make and beets are absolutly a nutritional powerhouse. Allow me to break down their nutritional benefits for you.

Beets:

  • contain phytonutrients called betalains. These powerful nutrients are antioxidants that significantly reduce inflammation. Betalains are also important in the body’s phase 2 detoxification where the liver and blood are purified of toxins using an extremely important antioxidant called glutathione. Go here to learn more about boosting your glutathione production.
  • Beet juice is known to increase stamina far more than the standard “energy” drink and  it boots glutathione production. (raw beets)
  • can lower your blood pressure by consuming beets.
  • are in immune boosting vitamin C.
  • High in folate, potassium and manganese, beets benefit your bones, kidneys, liver, and pancreas.

How to make Lacto-fermented Beets:

  • 6 large beets, roasted and peeled (cut the greens off and save for your salad) 
  • Starter culture, whey (4 T), or brine (4 T) from a previous batch. (Follow directions on package for amounts if using starter culture.)
  • Mason jars, sterilized (wide mouth quarts work best)
  • 1 Tablespoon Celtic sea salt
  • Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
  • Air locks (optional, but they really do protect your ferment from mold.)
  1. First, roast your beets. I wash them, pierce them a couple of times with a sharp knife and roast them at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they are cooled, I take the peels off with my hands. (They should come right off.)
  2. Then, if you are using starter culture, add it to some cool filtered water and add your salt to some warm filtered water to start it dissolving.
  3. Next, slice your beets. I like to do thin half moons. (about 1/4 inch thick)
  4. Add your beets to your jar(s) and pour the starter culture over them. Next pour the salt water over them. Fill the jar the rest of the way with filtered water (if needed), leaving about an inch to an inch and a half of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion. 
  5. Finally, add your weights and then top with your airlock lids.
  6. Leave in a place away from direct sunlight for three days to a week. you can keep testing the beets to see when they get fermented to your liking. 
  7. Note: You can play around with adding different flavors to beets. Some of my favorites are cardamom seeds/pods, garlic, or ginger. 

Fermented Beets
A fermented food that is a nutritional powerhouse as well as delicious.
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Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 large beets, roasted and peeled (see below)
  2. Starter culture, whey, or brine from a previous batch.
  3. Mason jars, sterilized (wide mouth quarts work best)
  4. Celtic sea salt
  5. Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
  6. Air lock (optional, but they really do protect your ferment from mold.)
Instructions
  1. First, roast your beets. I wash them, pierce them a couple of times with a sharp knife and roast them at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they are cooled, I take the peels off with my hands. (They should come right off.)
  2. If you are using starter culture, add it to some cool filtered water.
  3. Add your salt to some warm filtered water to start dissolving
  4. Next, slice your beets. I like to do thin half moons. (about 1/4 inch thick)
  5. Add your beets to your jar(s) and pour the starter culture over them. Next pour the salt water over them. Fill the jar the rest of the way with filtered water (if needed), leaving about an inch to an inch and a half of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion.
  6. Add your weights and then top with your airlock lids.
  7. Leave in a place away from direct sunlight for three days to a week. you can keep testing the beets to see when they get fermented to your liking.
  8. Note: You can play around with adding different flavors to beets. Some of my favorites are cardamom seeds/pods, garlic, or ginger.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
 Have you tried fermented beets? Are you going to make some?

Fermented Beets

 

 

 

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