Baked beans

Dutch Oven Baked Beans with Maple and Bacon

These Dutch Oven Baked Beans with Maple and Bacon are a great side to make if you are grilling this Father’s day. They go great with my Sourdough Cornbread,  Probiotic Potato Salad, and Carrot and Cabbage Coleslaw! You could even start off with some Homemade Ranch Dip and Veggies. Crack a cold one or pour yourself a kombucha spritzer and you’re ready! These baked beans are so delicious, are easy to make and you can make them ahead of time leaving you free to socialize with your family!

  • 2 cups of assorted dry beans (I like 1/2 cup kidney, 1/2 cup cannelini, and 1 cup small white beans)
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 4 to 8 slices pastured bacon
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoons mustard (yellow or brown)
  • 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 
  • sea salt to taste

Directions:

  1. First, soak your beans overnight, changing the water once or twice.
  2. Next, cook your bacon until almost finished. (It will cook the rest of the way in the beans.) Save about 1- 2 tablespoons of the bacon grease. 
  3. Next, drain your beans. Add your broth and your beans, bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and cook until tender. Stir gently. Most of the liquid should have boiled out.
  4. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
  5. In your dutch oven, heat the bacon grease and then add the onions on medium low. Cook until soft, about 7-10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds to a minute.
  6. Add the beans, ketchup, maple syrup, mustard powder, and vinegar and stir to combine. 
  7. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes to one hour. The mixture should bubbly and much thicker than when you started.
  8. Add salt to taste if needed. 

Baked beans

  • Dutch Oven Baked Beans with Maple and Bacon
    Delicious dutch oven baked beans with maple and bacon.
    Print
    Prep Time
    20 min
    Cook Time
    2 hr
    Prep Time
    20 min
    Cook Time
    2 hr
    Ingredients
    1. 2 cups of assorted dry beans (I like 1/2 cup kidney, 1/2 cup cannelini, and 1 cup small white beans)
    2. 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
    3. 8 slices pastured bacon
    4. 1/2 onion, chopped
    5. 2 cloves minced garlic
    6. 1/2 cup maple syrup
    7. 1 cup ketchup
    8. 1 tablespoons mustard powder
    9. 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
    Instructions
    1. First, soak your beans overnight, changing the water once or twice.
    2. Next, cook your bacon until almost finished. (It will cook the rest of the way in the beans.) Save about 1- 2 tablespoons of the bacon grease.
    3. Next, drain your beans. Add the broth to your beans, bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and cook until tender. About 1 hour. Stir gently occasionally. Most of the liquid should have boiled out.
    4. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
    5. In your dutch oven, heat the bacon grease and then add the onions on medium low. Cook until soft, about 7-10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds.
    6. Add the beans, ketchup, maple syrup, mustard, and vinegar and stir to combine.
    7. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes to one hour.
    8. Add salt to taste if needed.
    Adapted from Dutch oven baked beans with maple and bacon
    Adapted from Dutch oven baked beans with maple and bacon
    Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/

 

Homemade Ranch Dip with a veggie tray

Magnesium-rich Homemade Ranch Dip (or Dressing)

This homemade ranch dip is loaded with magnesium and probiotics as well as other important nutrients. There is no guilt when dipping your veggie (or even your cracker) into this delicious dip! I have written the recipe using dried herbs assuming that unless it is summer you probably won’t have all of them on hand. If you do happen to have them fresh, just use about half of the amount. Fresh herbs have more magnesium and other vitamins and minerals than dried, of course. Let me break down the nutritional highlights of this homemade ranch for you.

  • Homemade Mayo: Homemade mayo made with pastured egg yolks and avocado oil is abundant in healthy fats. If you choose to make a lacto-fermented option, this will up the probiotic content of your dip. 
  • Grass-fed kefir (or homemade yogurt or cultured sour cream): Kefir, homemade yogurt, and cultured sour cream are all good sources of healthy fats, calcium as well as magnesium. However, kefir contains far more probiotics than yogurt which contains more than cultured sour cream. Go here to learn how to make your own cultured sour cream.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: You have probably seen many a post about the wonders of raw apple cider vinegar. It is helpful in balancing blood sugar and managing weight among many other uses. It contains probiotics and beneficial acids.
  • Parsley: A good source of magnesium as well as other vitamins and minerals. 
  • Chives: A good source of magnesium as well as other vitamins and minerals. 
  • Dill: A good source of magnesium as well as other vitamins and minerals. 
  • Basil: A good source of magnesium as well as other vitamins and minerals. 
  • Garlic Powder: While there is minimal magnesium in garlic powder, it is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal.
  • Onion Powder: Onions follow in garlic’s footsteps. They have minimal magnesium, but are anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal. 
  • Sea Salt: Celtic and Himalayan are good sources of magnesium as well as other important minerals. 
  • Kelp Powder: With 780 mg of magnesium per 1/2 teaspoon of kelp powder, this is a great way to get your magnesium levels back up or to maintain them. Kelp powder is also a great source of many other minerals as well. 

Homemade Ranch Dip (or Dressing):

Homemade Ranch Close up

  • 1 cup homemade mayo (or quality store-bought brand)
  • 1 cup grass-fed kefir (strained). If you don’t have kefir, use grass-fed plain whole milk yogurt (homemade or quality store-bought). You could use grass-fed cultured sour cream as well. 
  • 1 teaspoon to one tablespoon Raw Apple Cider Vinegar (this will depend on how sour your kefir is. If you are using the sour cream or yogurt, go with the full tablespoon.)
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 2 teaspoon chives
  • 1 teaspoon parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon dill 
  • 1/2 teaspoon basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon kelp powder (optional but significantly increases the magnesium content)
  1. Mix all ingredients. Allow to meld together for at least a few hours before serving. 

 

Magnesium Rich Homemade Ranch Dressing or Dip
A nutrient-dense, delicious version of ranch dip that is loaded with magnesium and probiotics.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Prep Time
5 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup homemade mayo (or quality store-bought brand)
  2. 1 cup grass-fed kefir (strained). If you don't have kefir, use grass-fed plain whole milk yogurt (homemade or quality store-bought). You could use grass-fed cultured sour cream as well.
  3. 1 teaspoon to one tablespoon Raw Apple Cider Vinegar (this will depend on how sour your kefir is. If you are using the sour cream or yogurt, go with the full tablespoon.)
  4. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  5. 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  6. 2 teaspoon chives
  7. 1 teaspoon parsley
  8. 1/2 teaspoon dill
  9. 1/2 teaspoon basil
  10. 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  11. 1/2 teaspoon kelp powder (optional)
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients together. Let flavors meld for at least a few hours before serving.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
Marshmallows

Homemade Marshmallows made with Gut Healing Ingredients

These homemade marshmallows have collagen rich grass-fed gelatin and contain a decoction of marshmallow root. Both are healing to the gut lining. They use maple syrup and honey instead of corn syrup or refined sugar. They are still a treat, however, and I recommend just having one if you can stop yourself. Best made and taken to a party or campfire to share! 

To make homemade marshmallows you will need:

  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • organic chopped marshmallow root
  • 4 tablespoons grass-fed gelatin
  • 1/2 cup raw organic honey
  • 1/2 cup organic maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • coconut oil (avocado)
  • Arrowroot or organic cornstarch
  • Candy thermometer
  • Parchment Paper

Directions:

  1. First, add your marshmallow root and your water to a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil and then turn off the heat. Once the mixture has cooled to room temperature, strain out the marshmallow root.
  2. Next, add your gelatin to the bowl of your stand mixer with 1/2 cup of the marshmallow root water. This will allow the gelatin to soften.
  3. Next, add the honey, maple syrup, and 1/2 cup of the marshmallow root water to the medium-sized sauce pan you used before (be sure to rinse it out first.)(You may have some water leftover. Just drink or discard.) Make sure your pan is not too small or your mixture may boil over. It is a horrible mess to clean up! I am unfortunately speaking from experience here. Also, don’t use a large pan or your mixture may get too hot too quickly and burn. No fun!
  4. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat until it reaches 240-242 degrees, no higher.
  5. Next, turn on the stand mixer on low to mix soften gelatin. Very slowly add the honey/syrup mixture.
  6. Once all the honey/syrup mixture is added, turn your mixer on high. Once it is almost cool, usually about 7 minutes, add your vanilla. Mix for 1-3 more minutes.
  7. Spoon the mixture into a pan lined with parchment paper, greased with either coconut oil or avocado oil, and lightly dusted with either arrowroot powder or organic cornstarch. Choose the pan size for the shape marshmallow you like. The bigger the pan, the shallower the marshmallow. For a square marshmallow, choose and 8 x 8 pan.
  8. Smooth the top of your marshmallow mixture with your spatula. If it is not smooth emough, you can grease your hands and pat it down.
  9. Let your marshmallows set overnight. (You don’t have to do this, but they will cut much easier.)
  10. After your marshmallows have set up, use the parchment to life them out of the pan.
  11. Cut with a well-greased serrated knife or pizza cutter.
  12. Dust marshmallows with arrowroot powder or organic cornstarch (the only way to get cornstarch that is not GMO is to buy organic cornstarch.)
  13. These roast better after they have set out a bit. I set mine on racks for most of the day before moving them to an airtight container.

Homemade Marshmallows made with Gut Healing Ingredients
Print
Prep Time
40 min
Prep Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/4 cup water
  2. Organic Chopped Marshmallow Root
  3. 3 tablespoons grass-fed gelatin
  4. 1/2 cup raw organic honey
  5. 1/2 cup organic maple syrup
  6. 1 teaspoon vanilla
  7. 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  8. coconut oil (avocado)
  9. Arrowroot or organic cornstarch
  10. Candy thermometer
  11. Parchment Paper
Instructions
  1. First, add your marshmallow root and your water to a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil and then turn off the heat. Once the mixture has cooled to room temperature, strain out the marshmallow root.
  2. Next, add your gelatin to the bowl of your stand mixer with 1/2 cup of the marshmallow root water. This will allow the gelatin to soften.
  3. Next, add the honey, maple syrup, and 1/2 cup of the marshmallow root water to the medium-sized sauce pan you used before (be sure to rinse it out first.)(You may have some water leftover. Just drink or discard.) Make sure your pan is not too small or your mixture may boil over. It is a horrible mess to clean up! I am unfortunately speaking from experience here. Also, don't use a large pan or your mixture may get too hot too quickly and burn. No fun!
  4. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat until it reaches 240-242 degrees, no higher.
  5. Next, turn on the stand mixer on low to mix soften gelatin. Very slowly add the honey/syrup mixture.
  6. Once all the honey/syrup mixture is added, turn your mixer on high. Once it is almost cool, usually about 7 minutes, add your vanilla. Mix for 1-3 more minutes.
  7. Spoon the mixture into a pan lined with parchment paper, greased with either coconut oil or avocado oil, and lightly dusted with either arrowroot powder or organic cornstarch. Choose the pan size for the shape marshmallow you like. The bigger the pan, the shallower the marshmallow. For a square marshmallow, choose and 8 x 8 pan.
  8. Smooth the top of your marshmallow mixture with your spatula. If it is not smooth emough, you can grease your hands and pat it down.
  9. Let your marshmallows set overnight. (You don't have to do this, but they will cut much easier.)
  10. After your marshmallows have set up, use the parchment to life them out of the pan.
  11. Cut with a well-greased serrated knife or pizza cutter.
  12. Dust marshmallows with arrowroot powder or organic cornstarch (the only way to get cornstarch that is not GMO is to buy organic cornstarch.)
  13. These roast better after they have set out a bit. I set mine on racks for most of the day before moving them to an airtight container.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
Homemade Marshmallows

 

 

Carrot Cabbage Coleslaw

Carrot and Cabbage Coleslaw

This Carrot and Cabbage Coleslaw is perfect as a side for summer BBQs or picnics. If you like your coleslaw a bit sweeter, opt for the dried cranberries addition. This slaw is delicious as well as nutritious. Let me give you the nutritional highlights.

Cabbage Nutrition:

  • Extremely high in vitamin C which is crucial to a well-running immune system.
  • Rich in vitamin k which is a harder to get vitamin that helps your body absorb vitamin D as well as many other important functions.
  • High levels of powerful antioxidants such as thiocyanates, lutein, zeaxanthin, isothiocyanates, and sulforaphane.
  • Detoxifying (as a result of the above antioxidants).
  • Contains a good amount of fiber which is important in regulating blood sugar and preventing constipation..
  • A good source of folate, B6, B5, manganese, calcium, iron, and magnesium.
  • Raw cabbage contains goitrogens which can hamper thyroid function, so if you have a thyroid condition, don’t “indulge” in raw cabbage every day. 

Carrot Nutrition:

  • Contains a unique fiber that flushes out excess estrogen from our body!! (Since there are estrogen-like hormone disruptors in everything from plastic containers that we put our food in to body products that we slather on our skin, this is important for men and women alike.)
  • The soluble fiber in carrots helps lower blood sugar levels by slowing down the digestion of starch and sugar.
  • Rich in betacarotene which is a precursor to vitamin A. Vitamin A is good for your eyes, your immune system, and your growth and development.
  • Good source of biotin, K1, potassium, and vitamin B6.

Dressing Nutrition:

  • Lacto-fermented (Kombucha/Probiotic) Mayo: The pastured eggs yolks in this mayo contain healthy omega 3 fats, protein, most of the B vitamins and well as vitamins A, E, D, and K as well as important hard to get minerals such as choline and selenium. The avocado oil is full of healthy monounsaturated fats. The kombucha in this lacto-fermented mayo both gives probiotics and beneficial acids as well as preserves the mayo for a longer shelf life. 
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: Helpful in managing blood sugar and contains probiotics and beneficial acids. 
  • Raw Honey: Contains 22 amino acids, 27 minerals, and 5,000 enzymes. Go here for an in-depth look at the nutritional benefits of raw honey (which are many!)
  • Dried Cranberries: Are loaded with antioxidants and are a good source of iodine (this is important if you have switched to sea salt over chemical laden iodized salt.) Contain many minerals. Go here to learn more. 

To make Carrot and Cabbage Coleslaw, you will need:

  • One small cabbage, shredded
  • 4 organic carrots, shredded
  • One cup of probiotic mayo (or half a cup probiotic mayo and 1/2 cup homemade yogurt or kefir)
  • 1/4 cup raw ACV
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw Honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Optional: Organic dried cranberries (or raisins)

Directions:

  1. First, shred your cabbage and carrots and add to a large bowl.
  2. Next, in a small bowl, mix your mayo (and yogurt if using), ACV, honey, and salt.
  3. Add the dressing to the carrots and cabbage and toss.
  4. Finally, add the cranberries if using.
  5. This is best when it is allowed to set for a few hours to let the flavors meld.

 

Carrot Cabbage Coleslaw
Carrots and Cabbage tossed with a kombucha mayo-based dressing.
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. One small cabbage, shredded
  2. 4 organic carrots, shredded
  3. one cup of probiotic mayo (or half a cup probiotic mayo and 1/2 cup homemade yogurt or kefir)
  4. 1/4 cup raw ACV
  5. 2 Tablespoons Raw Honey
  6. 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  7. Optional: Organic dried cranberries (or raisins)
Instructions
  1. First, shred your cabbage and carrots and add to a large bowl.
  2. Next, in a small bowl, mix your mayo (and yogurt if using), ACV, honey, and salt.
  3. Add the dressing to the carrots and cabbage and toss.
  4. Finally, add the raisins or cranberries if using.
  5. This is best when it is allowed to set for a few hours to let the flavors meld.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
 Carrot Cabbage Colelaw

Probiotic Potato Salad

Probiotic Potato Salad: Feed Your Microbiome with Resistant Starch and “Good” Bacteria

This nutrient dense, delicious recipe for probiotic potato salad gets its probiotics from the lacto-fermented mayonnaise, the raw apple cider vinegar, and the lacto-fermented pickles. Also, the cooked and cooled potatoes are full of resistant starch to feed your microbiome. This twist on an old classic is perfect for barbecues, picnics, and camping and is quick to prepare. As usual, I would like to break down the nutritional value for you.

Nutritional Benefits from Probiotic Potato Salad:

  • Lacto-fermented (Kombucha/Probiotic) Mayo: The pastured eggs yolks in this mayo contain healthy omega 3 fats, protein, most of the B vitamins and well as vitamins A, E, D, and K as well as important hard to get minerals such as choline and selenium. The avocado oil is full of healthy monounsaturated fats. The kombucha in this lacto-fermented mayo both gives probiotics and beneficial acids as well as preserves the mayo for a longer shelf life. 
  • Pastured Eggs: Loaded with protein and amino acids as well as everything just listed above for egg yolks. The egg whites also contain magnesium, potassium, and sodium. 
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: Helpful in managing blood sugar and contains probiotics and beneficial acids. 
  • Red potatoes: As stated above, cooked and cooled potatoes are a great source of resistant starch. If you are not sure why you need resistant starch to feed your microbiome, go here.
  • Lacto-fermented dill pickles: (Bubbie’s is a good brand if you don’t make your own.): Lacto-fermented pickles are full of probiotics and super tasty. This is what a real pickle was until they started being produced on the assembly line. Go here for a good recipe to make your own. 
  • Dill: An anti-microbial herb that can help with depression, aid digestion, lower cholesterol, and even repel bugs. Contains vitamin A, vitamin C, and manganese. Go here for more information. 
  • Mustard: Contains potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium.

To make Probiotic Potato Salad you will need:

Probiotic Potato Salad

  • 2-2.5 pounds organic red potatoes
  • 6 hardboiled pastured eggs, chopped
  • 4-8 lacto-fermented pickles, chopped
  • 1 1/4-1 1/2 cup Kombucha Mayo
  • 2 tablespoons Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon organic maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon yellow mustard
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt

Directions: 

  1. First, hard boil the eggs and put them in an ice bath to cool.
  2. Next, quarter the potatoes, put them in a pot, and cover them with water. Bring them to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for 10-15 minutes. You want them to be fork-tender.
  3. Once they are cooked, drain and let them cool.
  4. Meanwhile, chop the pickles and then make the dressing in a large bowl. Add the mayo, ACV, maple syrup, mustard, salt, and stir.
  5. After the potatoes have cooled to just above room temperature, add them to the dressing and toss.
  6. Finally, add the eggs and pickles and toss some more. Add chopped dill to the top of the salad, or serve on the side. It tastes better when the flavors have had a chance to meld for at least a few hours. 

Probiotic Potato Salad
A nutrient dense potato salad filled with probiotics and resistant starch.
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 2-2.5 pounds organic red potatoes
  2. 6 hardboiled pastured eggs, chopped
  3. 4-8 lacto-fermented pickles, chopped
  4. 1 1/4-1 1/2 cup Kombucha Mayo
  5. 2 Tablespoons Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
  6. 2 Tablespoons organic maple syrup
  7. 1 Tablespoon yellow mustard
  8. 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  9. Chopped fresh dill
Instructions
  1. First, hard boil the eggs and put them in an ice bath to cool.
  2. Next, quarter the potatoes, put them in a pot, and cover them with water. Bring them to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for 10-15 minutes. You want them to be fork-tender.
  3. Once they are cooked, drain and let them cool.
  4. Meanwhile, chop the pickles and then make the dressing in a large bowl. Add the mayo, ACV, syrup, mustard, salt, and stir.
  5. After the potatoes have cooled to just above room temperature, add them to the dressing and toss.
  6. Finally, add the eggs and pickles and toss some more. Add chopped fresh dill to the top of the salad, or serve on the side.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
 Do you love potato salad? Are you trying to get more resistant starch or probiotics? Are you going to try this recipe? Let me know if you do!!

Tiger Nut Milk

Tiger Nut Milk (AKA Horchata de Chufa) and Soaked Tiger Nuts: Tasty Treats With Resistant Starch

Tiger Nuts as a Simple Snack

Since tiger nuts have been dried to allow for long storage, you will need to rehydrate them. Soak your tiger nuts in water for at least 12 hours and up to 48. The soaking time will change the texture. Less soaking equals crunchier tiger nuts and more equals softer tiger nuts. You can also add flavorings such as cinnamon sticks and or vanilla beans to the soaking water. Drain and let dry and enjoy!! 

Horchata de chufa (tiger nut milk)

Another tasty way to get the benefits of tiger nuts, such as resistant starch, is horchata de chufa. Instead of being made from rice, this Spanish horchata is made from tiger nuts.

  • 1 cup of tiger nuts that have been soaked overnight and drained
  • 4 cups almost boiling water
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup 
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • Ground cinnamon
  1. Add your soaked and then drained nuts to your Vitamix or other high powered blender.
  2. Add the hot water to your blender and blend on high for about 2 minutes, or until fairly smooth.
  3. Pour this mixture through cheesecloth or nut milk bag into a bowl.
  4. Once the mixture is cool enough to handle, make a bag with the cheesecloth to squeeze out the extra liquid with your hands.
  5. Add your salt and maple syrup and mix.
  6. This drink is traditionally served cold and/or over ice.
  7. This should keep for about a week in your fridge.
Horchata de Chufa
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup of tiger nuts that have been soaked overnight and drained
  2. 4 cups almost boiling water
  3. 1/4 cup maple syrup
  4. 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  5. Ground cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Add your drained soaked nuts to your Vitamix or other high powered blender.
  2. Add the hot water to your blender and blend on high for about 2 minutes, or until smooth.
  3. Pour this mixture through cheesecloth into a bowl.
  4. Make a bag with the cheesecloth to squeeze out the extra liquid with your hands.
  5. Add your salt and maple syrup and mix.
  6. This drink is traditionally served cold and/or over ice.
  7. This should keep for about a week in your fridge.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/

 

 

 

Tiger Nut "Corn" Bread

Tiger Nut “Corn” bread: A Delicious Way to get your Resistant Starch (Gluten-free, Grain-free, Corn-free)

Although there is no corn in this cornbread-like tiger nut bread, it is tasty and loaded with resistant starch! If you haven’t yet heard of the importance of resistant starch, go here. If you have, then you are probably hoping to find some easy ways to incorporate resistant starch into your diet to feed your microbiome. Well here you go, my friend. First though, indulge me while I breakdown the other benefits of tiger nuts for you. 🙂

Tiger NutS:

  • Are not a nut but a tuber.
  • Contain resistant starch to feed the bacteria in your colon (as stated above)
  • Are full of antioxidants
  • Contain a ton of fiber (10 grams per serving) 
  • Are antibacterial
  • are a good source of iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, and B6

Quick note: If you are experiencing a gluten sensitivity, are Celiac, or just like to rotate your grains seasonally like we try to do, you can rest easy because this recipe is gluten-free. If you make this bread with buckwheat flour instead of brown rice flour, it will also be grain-free. As stated above, there isn’t actually any corn in this recipe either. We call it tiger nut “corn” bread because the gritty texture of the tiger nut flour is reminiscent of the grittiness of corn bread. We like to top this bread with cultured honey butter!

Tiger Nut “Corn” Bread Recipe (gluten-free)

  • 2/3 cup tiger nut flour
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour (or you van use rice flour if you aren’t grain-free)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 3 pastured eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup non-homogenized grass-fed milk or milk substitute (coconut milk works well)
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 6 tablespoons melted grass-fed butter, plus 2 more for pan
  1. Preheat oven to 400 and put your cast iron skillet in to preheat.
  2. Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  3. Add wet ingredients and mix.
  4. Take skillet out of oven and add a couple of tablespoons of butter and melt it.
  5. Pour batter into hot cast iron skillet. Bake for 15 minutes.
Tiger Nut "Corn" Bread
A corn bread like tasty treat full of resistant starch.
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 2/3 cup tiger nut flour
  2. 1 cup rice flour (brown or white) (Use Acadian Buckwheat for grain-free version)
  3. 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  4. 2 tablespoons baking powder
  5. 3 pastured eggs, lightly beaten
  6. 1 cup milk or milk substitute
  7. 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  8. 6 tablespoons melted grass-fed butter or ghee, plus 2 more for pan
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 and put your cast iron skillet in to preheat.
  2. Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  3. Add wet ingredients and mix.
  4. Take skillet out of oven and add a couple of tablespoons of butter and melt it.
  5. Pour batter into hot cast iron skillet. Bake for 15 minutes.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/

Tiger Nut "Corn" Bread

 

Are you gluten-free or grain-free and looking forward to tasting something like corn bread again? 

Kraut

Three Easy Ways to Add Fermented Foods to Your Daily Diet and a Basic Kraut Recipe

You have probably heard that fermented foods like kraut (sauerkraut) are full of probiotics and that probiotics feed the good bacteria in your gut or microbiome. Now the question is how to get them into your daily routine so that they become a habit. You are much more likely to eat fermented foods if they are on hand all the time, of course. One easy way to assure that this is so is to make your own. Most fermented foods are truly simple to make and do not require a lot of time. I usually do it while I am in the kitchen making dinner anyway. See the bottom of the post for a basic recipe for Kraut that you can change up however you like. 

      1. Breakfast: You’ve heard me say this before. Start your day with kefir (water or milk) mixed into a smoothie (or a “shake” as my kids call it). We have this in addition to our breakfast. 
      2. Soups, Salads, and Sandwiches: Top your finished soup with veggie ferments (kraut and kimchi work well). Just be sure to let your soup cool for a minute or two so that you don’t kill the beneficial bacteria with the heat. You can also add veggie ferments to your salads. Radishes, beets, jicama, and carrots are my favorites). Add veggie ferments to your sandwiches. Pickles come to mind, of course
      3. Snack Time: Make fermented foods your snack We like to make homemade ranch dressing with homemade yogurt, and homeade kombucha mayo. The we dip raw veggies like carrot sticks and sugar snap peas for a healthy snack. Another favorite snack is homemade yogurt with a drizzle of maple syrup or a dollop of lemon curd.  
      4. Bonus: Add a glass of kombucha or water kefir lemonade to your daily routine! So simple to do and so delicious.

Veggie Ferments

Basic Kraut Recipe

Kraut Close Up

      • One large head cabbage (or 2 small)
      • 2.5 Tablespoons Celtic Sea Salt
      • Filtered Water
      • Optional: Spices: one Tablespoon caraway or juniper berries (Caraway is my favorite.)
      • Mason Jars (wide mouth quart), sterilized (3 or 4)
      • Airlocks, sterilized (optional but they do really protect your ferment)
      • Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)

Shredded cabbage for Kraut

 

      1. First, take off the first couple of layers of cabbage. Then shred or cut the the cabbage. I like to do this with a knife because I like crunchy kraut, but you could use the shredder function on your food processor. Do not use the core. 
      2. Put the shredded cabbage in a large glass or steel bowl.
      3. Next, sprinkle the salt over the cut cabbage. Let the salt sit on the cabbage for about 20 minutes or so.
      4. After the salt has soaked into the cabbage, use your hands to mix it and “work” it into the cabbage. You should be seeing the liquid in the bottom of the bowl grow. Work it for about 5 or 10 minutes. (You can do this with a wooden or stainless steel mallet as well.)
      5. Now mix in the spices if you are using them. I like to use 2 teaspoons to one tablespoon of caraway seeds.
      6. Finally, add the cabbage and salt (and spice) mixture to your mason jars. Pour the salty cabbage water over the top, dividing it equally between your jars. Add water to cover the cabbage, leaving about an inch or inch and a half from the top of the jar to allow for expansion during fermentation. Top with a fermentation weight to keep your cabbage submerged in brine. (Or you could use the cabbage core or a sterilized rock.) Keeping the cabbage submerged is crucial to not developing mold!
      7. Screw on your airlock lids or regular lids. The airlocks are optional, but they really do help protect your ferment. 
      8. Let it set out of direct sunlight for at least 3 days and up to 2 weeks. 
         
Basic Kraut Recipe
Basic Sauerkraut is so easy to make!!
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. One large head cabbage
  2. 3 Tablespoons Celtic Sea Salt
  3. Filtered Water
  4. Spices: Some common choices are caraway or juniper berries (optional)
  5. Mason Jars (wide mouth quart), sterilized
  6. Airlocks, sterilized (optional but they do really protect your ferment)
  7. Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
Instructions
  1. First, Shred or cut the the cabbage. I like to do this with a knife, but you could use the shredder function on your food processor.
  2. Put the shredded cabbage in a large glass or steel bowl.
  3. Next, sprinkle the salt over the cut cabbage. Let the salt sit on the cabbage for about 20 minutes or so.
  4. After the salt has soaked into the cabbage, use your hands to mix it and "work" it into the cabbage. You should be seeing the liquid in the bottom of the bowl grow. Work it for about 5 or 10 minutes.
  5. Now add the spices if you are going to. I like to use 2 teaspoons to one tablspoon of caraway seeds.
  6. Finally, add the cabbage and salt mixture to your mason jars. Pour the salty cabbage water over the top, dividing it equally between your jars. Add water to cover the cabbage, leaving about an inch or inch and a half from the top of the jar to allow for expansion during fermentation.
  7. Let it sit out of direct sunlight for at least 3 days and up to 2 weeks.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
    1.  Do you make your own kraut? What are your tricks for getting fermented foods into your daily diet?

 

Kraut

Veggie Ferments

 

 

Kiddie Kimchi

“Kiddie” Kimchi

What is “Kiddie” Kimchi, you ask? It is a yummy kimchi-like ferment full of super-foods and probiotics  to feed my family’s microbiomes. I love Kimchi, but my kids do not do spicy. Not at all. This ferment uses some of the great flavors and powerful nutrition of kimchi, but leaves out the spice.

Kimchi generally uses Napa cabbage instead of regular green cabbage. It also has garlic (or scallions), ginger, and nutrient-packed sea vegetables. Let me break down the nutritional benefits for you so that you see why I want to get these amazing foods into my family’s diet regularly.

Garlic:

  • reduced blood pressure
  • contains manganese, B6 (energy), vitamin C (immune boosting), Selenium (important for sleep), and fiber
  • can combat the common cold and other sicknesses because it is antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal 
  • lowers “bad” cholesterol
  • protects the brain from diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia
  • detoxifies heavy metals from the body

Ginger is:

  • great for digestion and can even help with chronic indigestion when taken regularly
  • good for nausea, especially morning sickness
  • anti-inflammatory (good since inflammation is the root of disease)
  • balancing to blood sugar (great for the roller coater ride called the Standard American Diet SAD)
  • full of anti-cancer properties
  • a protector of the brain from diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia
  • very effective against oral bacteria such as gingivitis and periodontitis
  • helpful for lowering “bad” cholesterol

Dulse is:

  • an excellent source of iodine which can be very helpful for those with thyroid disease and to prevent thyroid disease from occurring
  • High in immune boosting vitamin C
  • High in vitamin A which is important for maintaining and improving vision
  • Rich in B6 and minerals such as potassium. Potassium balances sodium in your body and regulates water retention. It can also lower blood pressure.
  • a decent source of iron which can improve circulation.
  • full of antioxidants
  • high in omega fatty acids that can improve brain and nervous system function
  • able to regulate digestive processes. Can be especially helpful in relieving constipation or diarrhea.
  • able to help the body build strong bones because it is full of calcium, magnesium, and iron.

“Kiddie” Kimchi Recipe

Kiddie Kimchi Close Up

  • One large head Napa cabbage
  • 2 Tablespoons Celtic Sea Salt
  • Filtered Water
  • Ginger, either minced or in big chunks that you can pull out later. (I add a couple of one inch pieces (peels on) because although my kids like the taste of ginger, they don’t like being surprised by a bite of it.)
  • Garlic (2 or 3 cloves) either minced or whole to pull out after fermentation. (I opt for the whole clove route and pull them out after fermentation because my kids feel the same way about garlic as they do about ginger.) 
  • Dulse, chopped or flaked. (1-2 tablespoons)
  • Mason Jars (wide mouth quart work best), sterilized
  • Airlocks, sterilized (optional but they do really protect your ferment)
  • Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
  1. First, cut the the cabbage into thin “shreds”. 
  2. Put the shredded cabbage in a large glass or stainless steel bowl.
  3. Next, sprinkle the salt over the cabbage. Let the salt sit on the cabbage for about 20 minutes or so.
  4. After the salt has soaked into the cabbage, use your hands to mix it and “work” it into the cabbage. Napa cabbage isn’t as firm as green cabbage, so it doesn’t need as much “working”.
  5. Now add your ginger, garlic, and dulse and mix in.
  6. Finally, add the mixture to your mason jars. Pour the salty cabbage water over the top, dividing it equally between your jars. Add your fermentation weight and pack the kimchi down. Add water to cover the mixture, leaving about an inch or inch and a half from the top of the jar to allow for expansion during fermentation. Top with your airlock lids (or plain plastic lids).
  7. Let it sit our of direct sunlight for at least 3 days and up to 2 weeks. 
  8. If you want to make this spicy, add Korean chili powder. There are many variations on Kimchi, but a lot of them also use scallions as well. Some use fish sauce, some dried shrimp, etc. Feel free to experiment!!

"Kiddie" Kimchi
A tasty kimchi recipe without the spice.
Print
Ingredients
  1. One large head Napa cabbage
  2. 3 Tablespoons Celtic Sea Salt
  3. Filtered Water
  4. Ginger, either minced or in big chunks that you can pull out later. (I add a couple of one inch pieces because although my kids like the taste of ginger, they don't like getting a bite of it.)
  5. Garlic, either minced or whole cloves to pull out later. (I opt for the clove route and pull them out after fermentation because my kids feel the same way about garlic as they do about ginger.
  6. Dulse, chopped or flaked.
  7. Mason Jars (wide mouth quart), sterilized
  8. Airlocks, sterilized (optional but they do really protect your ferment)
  9. Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
Instructions
  1. First, cut the the cabbage into thin "shreds".
  2. Put the shredded cabbage in a large glass or stainless steel bowl.
  3. Next, sprinkle the salt over the cabbage. Let the salt sit on the cabbage for about 20 minutes or so.
  4. After the salt has soaked into the cabbage, use your hands to mix it and "work" it into the cabbage. Napa cabbage isn't as firm as green cabbage, so it doesn't need as much "working".
  5. Now add your ginger, garlic, and dulse and mix in.
  6. Finally, add the mixture to your mason jars. Pour the salty cabbage water over the top, dividing it equally between your jars. Add your fermentation weight and pack the kimchi down. Add water to cover the mixture, leaving about an inch or inch and a half from the top of the jar to allow for expansion during fermentation. Top with your airlock lids (or plain plastic lids).
  7. Let it sit our of direct sunlight for at least 3 days and up to 2 weeks.
Notes
  1. If you want to make this spicy, just add Korean chili powder or the peppers of your choice.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
 Do you like Kimchi flavors but have a hard time with spice? Do you love traditional Kimchi? Are you going to try making this?

Kiddie Kimchi

 

Fermented Beets

Fermented Beets: A Nutritional Powerhouse

Fermented beets (or “pickled”) are one of my favorite ferments. I like to eat them in my salads. They also go great with goat cheese!! They are so simple to make and beets are absolutly a nutritional powerhouse. Allow me to break down their nutritional benefits for you.

Beets:

  • contain phytonutrients called betalains. These powerful nutrients are antioxidants that significantly reduce inflammation. Betalains are also important in the body’s phase 2 detoxification where the liver and blood are purified of toxins using an extremely important antioxidant called glutathione. Go here to learn more about boosting your glutathione production.
  • Beet juice is known to increase stamina far more than the standard “energy” drink and  it boots glutathione production. (raw beets)
  • can lower your blood pressure by consuming beets.
  • are in immune boosting vitamin C.
  • High in folate, potassium and manganese, beets benefit your bones, kidneys, liver, and pancreas.

How to make Lacto-fermented Beets:

  • 6 large beets, roasted and peeled (cut the greens off and save for your salad) 
  • Starter culture, whey (4 T), or brine (4 T) from a previous batch. (Follow directions on package for amounts if using starter culture.)
  • Mason jars, sterilized (wide mouth quarts work best)
  • 1 Tablespoon Celtic sea salt
  • Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
  • Air locks (optional, but they really do protect your ferment from mold.)
  1. First, roast your beets. I wash them, pierce them a couple of times with a sharp knife and roast them at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they are cooled, I take the peels off with my hands. (They should come right off.)
  2. Then, if you are using starter culture, add it to some cool filtered water and add your salt to some warm filtered water to start it dissolving.
  3. Next, slice your beets. I like to do thin half moons. (about 1/4 inch thick)
  4. Add your beets to your jar(s) and pour the starter culture over them. Next pour the salt water over them. Fill the jar the rest of the way with filtered water (if needed), leaving about an inch to an inch and a half of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion. 
  5. Finally, add your weights and then top with your airlock lids.
  6. Leave in a place away from direct sunlight for three days to a week. you can keep testing the beets to see when they get fermented to your liking. 
  7. Note: You can play around with adding different flavors to beets. Some of my favorites are cardamom seeds/pods, garlic, or ginger. 

Fermented Beets
A fermented food that is a nutritional powerhouse as well as delicious.
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 large beets, roasted and peeled (see below)
  2. Starter culture, whey, or brine from a previous batch.
  3. Mason jars, sterilized (wide mouth quarts work best)
  4. Celtic sea salt
  5. Fermentation weights (or a sterilized flat rock)
  6. Air lock (optional, but they really do protect your ferment from mold.)
Instructions
  1. First, roast your beets. I wash them, pierce them a couple of times with a sharp knife and roast them at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they are cooled, I take the peels off with my hands. (They should come right off.)
  2. If you are using starter culture, add it to some cool filtered water.
  3. Add your salt to some warm filtered water to start dissolving
  4. Next, slice your beets. I like to do thin half moons. (about 1/4 inch thick)
  5. Add your beets to your jar(s) and pour the starter culture over them. Next pour the salt water over them. Fill the jar the rest of the way with filtered water (if needed), leaving about an inch to an inch and a half of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion.
  6. Add your weights and then top with your airlock lids.
  7. Leave in a place away from direct sunlight for three days to a week. you can keep testing the beets to see when they get fermented to your liking.
  8. Note: You can play around with adding different flavors to beets. Some of my favorites are cardamom seeds/pods, garlic, or ginger.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
 Have you tried fermented beets? Are you going to make some?

Fermented Beets