Bone Broth

Bone Broth: Have you Jumped on the Bandwagon yet?

Bone Broth is all the rage these days and has been for the last few years. If you haven’t jumped on the bandwagon, let me tell you why you should!

Benefits of Bone Broth:

  • Promotes a healthy microbiome
  • Boosts the immune system
  • Detoxifies the body and aids metabolism (This is because it contains glutathione which is one of the most potent known detoxifiers.)
  • Full of bio-available (easy for the body to absorb) minerals such as Magnesium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Sulfur, Silicon and more
  • Contains many healing amino acids which are generally deficient in the Standard American Diet (SAD) (such as proline, glutamine, and glycine)
  • Seals the digestive tract (this helps with leaky gut and food sensitivities)
  • Contains collagen and glucosamine which ease joint pain and stiffness
  • Collagen also plumps skin, grows strong hair and nails, and improves muscle flexibility and strength

Sounds amazing, right? It also tastes amazing and is so simple to make. The biggest ingredient is time. Not time standing over the stove, mind you, just time waiting. I’m betting you are sold and would now like to know how you can make this super-food in your very own kitchen. (Printable versions are at the bottom of the post.)

To make bone broth you will need.:

  1. Pasture-raised bones (these can be chicken, turkey, pork, beef, lamb or a mix)
  2. Stewing meat (only in the case of beef or lamb)
  3. Onion(s)
  4. Carrots
  5. Celery
  6. Filtered Water
  7. Acidic medium (white wine, raw apple cider vinegar, or red wine (for beef or lamb bones)

There are other ingredients you can add, of course, such as herbs and spices. I prefer to make a basic broth, sort of like a blank canvas.Then, once I know what I am doing with a particular broth, I can season it from there. I don’t even salt it until I go to use it in a dish. There are slightly different methods for beef versus chicken, so I will break these down separately. You could also do a mixed broth with bones from different animals.

For Chicken Bone Broth: (Printable version at Bottom of post)

Bone Broth

  1. For chicken bone broth, I use the carcass of a roasted pasture-raised bird. Once I remove most of the meat from the carcass, I put it into my crock pot (I use this one) and cover it with filtered water. I also add two chicken feet (you can get these from a specialty grocery store or your butcher if you have one) and the neck that came with the bird when I bought it. The chicken feet might seem gross, but they contain the most collagen of any part of the bird and will help your broth gel. Add 1/4 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar and let it sit for 45 minutes to an hour so that the acid can leach the minerals from the bones.
  2. Then, turn on your cock pot on low for 10-12 hours.
  3. Once it is finished, wait for the stock to cool a bit before handling. Lay cheesecloth over a fine mesh strainer and strain the broth through it. Compost the bones and vegetables.
  4. I usually store my  broth in the fridge in glass mason jars marked with the date, or in the freezer in ice cubes.  It will last about a week in the fridge.

For beef (or lamb) bone broth: (Printable version at bottom of post)

  1. I use a mix of knuckle and marrow bones to make beef bone broth.
  2. First roast the bones in the oven for an hour at 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Then put the bones in your crock pot or turkey roaster (I use this one) and cover with filtered water. Add 1/4 cup red wine. Let the bones sit for about 45 min to an hour to allow the wine to draw out minerals from the bones.
  3. Turn your crock pot on low for 12 hours.
  4. After 12 hours, add an onion, 2 carrots, 2 ribs of celery and 1/2 pound of chopped beef. This should be a very cheap cut. It is just to add depth of flavor. Add more water if needed. Let this all cook for another 12 hours on low.
  5. Once it is finished, wait for the stock to cool a bit before handling. Lay cheesecloth over a fine mesh strainer and strain the broth through it. Compost the bones and vegetables.
  6. I usually store my  broth in my fridge in glass mason jars marked with the date, or in the freezer in ice cubes.  It will last about a week in the fridge.

What to do with bone broth:

  • Drink it like tea with a sprinkling of Celtic Sea Salt
  • Make soup, stew, or chili with it (try  making a simple Chicken and Rice Soup or tom kha gai)
  • Give your rice, quinoa, pasta, or mashed root veggies a nutrient boost by cooking them in it!
  • Add it to your marinara.
  • Put it in anything you would normally use stock for.
Chicken Bone Broth
Make nourishing bone broth at home with just a few ingredients.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Prep Time
5 min
Ingredients
  1. Chicken bones (carcass, feet, backs, neck)
  2. 2 carrots
  3. 2 celery ribs
  4. 1 onion
Instructions
  1. For chicken bone broth, I use the carcass of a roasted pasture-raised bird. Once I remove most of the meat from the carcass, I put it into my crock pot (I use this one) and cover it with filtered water. I also add two chicken feet (you can get these from a specialty grocery store or your butcher if you have one) and the neck that came with the bird when I bought it. The chicken feet might seem gross, but they contain the most collagen of any part of the bird and will help your broth gel.Add 1/4 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar and let it sit for 45 minutes to an hour so that the acid can leach the minerals from the bones.
  2. Then, turn on your cock pot on low for 10-12 hours.
  3. Once it is finished, wait for the stock to cool a bit before handling. Lay cheesecloth over a fine mesh strainer and strain the broth through it. Compost the bones and vegetables.
  4. I usually store my broth in the fridge in glass mason jars marked with the date, or in the freezer in ice cubes. It will last about a week in the fridge.
Notes
  1. You can cook rice, potatoes, veggies, and pasta in your broth to add extra nutrition.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/
Beef Bone Broth
Make nutritious bone broth at home.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
24 hr
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
24 hr
Ingredients
  1. 3 pounds of mixed beef bones (knuckle and marrow)
  2. 1/2 pound chopped beef (inexpensive cut such as chuck or eye of round)
  3. 1/2 cup red wine
  4. 1 onion
  5. 2 carrots
  6. 2 ribs of celery
Instructions
  1. I use a mix of knuckle and marrow bones to make beef bone broth.
  2. First, roast the bones in the oven for an hour at 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Then put the bones in your crock pot or turkey roaster and cover with filtered water. Add 1/2 cup red wine. Let the bones sit for about 45 min to an hour to allow the wine to draw out minerals from the bones.
  3. Turn your crock pot on low for 12 hours.
  4. After 12 hours, add an onion, 2 carrots, 2 ribs of celery and 1/2 pound of chopped beef. This should be a very cheap cut. It is just to add depth to the flavor. Add more water if needed to be sure that it is all covered. Let this all cook for another 12 hours on low.
  5. Once it is finished, wait for the stock to cool a bit before handling. Lay cheesecloth over a fine mesh strainer and strain the broth through it. Compost the bones and vegetables.
  6. I usually store my broth in my fridge in glass mason jars marked with the date, or in the freezer in ice cubes. It will last about a week in the fridge.
Reclaiming Vitality http://reclaimingvitality.com/

If you like the idea of this, but don’t see yourself actually getting around to making bone broth, you can buy Vital Proteins Grass-fed Collagen Peptides. I actually put this in my tea in the morning in addition to the bone broth that we get into our diet throughout the average day. It dissolves in hot or cold water and hardly has any taste. It is a great source of collagen, protein, and those healing amino acids we discussed above.

If you think you are more than interested in making your own broth and would like to know more, check out this beautiful cookbook from Jenny over at Nourished Kitchen. Broth and Stock from the Nourished Kitchen. Her cookbooks are as enjoyable to read as a good novel. I like to settle in with a cup of tea or kombucha (or maybe wine if it’s evening time) and peruse the beautiful pictures and recipes to get inspired!
If you are interested in fasting or cleansing using bone broth, check out the Bone Broth Diet book. It details the many benefits of bone broth fasting.

How about you? Do you make bone broth at home?

 

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